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Thread: L61r bolt shroud.

  1. #31
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    This is a fantastically informative thread -- and thanks for the great photos, Piper235b!

    As I said in another post, I've never seen the recessed striker (firing pin) assembly in a Sako in the U.S. in forty-five years of looking, so their origin is quite a puzzle, as is the fact that they seem to be limited to Australia, at least so far as info on this thread has revealed.

    One thing which is obvious about the recessed striker is that its mass would appear to be significantly less than that of the "regular" striker. This would mean several things: One, the firing pin fall (lock time) would be faster, assuming the same weight spring. Two, the firing pin striking force (momentum) would be lighter due to the lighter mass. Three, unless a significantly stronger spring were used, the striking force of the firing pin might be marginal for thick/hard primers, but the action's accuracy potential would be theoretically improved due to the faster lock time and less inertia imapacting the aim of the rifle when the striker is released. I wonder if anyone has observed any difference in ignition between the two types of firing pin assemblies?

    Texas Hill Country

  2. #32
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    I've seen one of the 'short striker' Sakos in Oz (Townsville). It was a HB 222 with a single set trigger (Canjar?), and the owner was telling me how great the microgroove barrel was.

    Strange that the microgroove barrels made it to the US, but the short strikers did not?

  3. #33
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    No doubt one of these Aussie issue 'short striker', M marked micro groove rifles would be very desireable in a US collection. Being the generous type of bloke I am, I'm prepared to swap my ratty old .222 for a pristine Deluxe .222. PM me now......what's that you say...."tell him he's dreaming"....

    Two other thoughts on their possible origin:-
    (A) in the best Australian scrounging tradition ....the importers bought them 'cheap'.
    (B) they were experimental and sent out here for market testing. (It has been happening for years with cars).

    Cheers
    Piper

  4. #34
    Senior Member topgear's Avatar
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    Well I've looked back through some stuff I have and I believe these cocking pieces run from about 1962/63 until around 1966/67 here in Australia. They are all definitely factory and like I say I've seen a lot of them (50-100 individual rifles). All rifles I've seen of this era have the short cocking piece out here.

    Considering Australia's market share (total population of the country was only 11 million in 1965 compared to the US with 195 million) I find it hard to believe you would bother changing the cocking piece to save a few cents just for ozzies. Also if it was experimental it seems to have went on for quiet a few years?

    So ...... I don't know.

    One thing D.W. Custer (the importer) definitely did some good deals with sako and they seemed to do some amazing one off stuff just for his company and know one else. For instance the DW Custer commerative finnwolf stock has a total of only 105 units which have a special checkering pattern and there were super deluxe stocks out here on the AI, AII and AIII. Maybe his daughter was married to someone of sako fame! so could call in some favours :)

    Stonecreek - I use remington primers (known to be hard) and have never had an issue. I knew of a roo shooter here in oz who went through 4 barrels on a .222 L461. All he replaced apart from the barrells was the extractor. So I don't think weakness has ever been a problem- but maybe it uses a different spring?
    Last edited by topgear; 16th May 2012 at 13:37.
    Australia

  5. #35
    Super Moderator misako50's Avatar
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    Topgear- Makes me wonder if they used the same springs (size) of the L579s or even the L57 springs that may have been left over from the end of production. It would be somewhat interesting to see a direct comparison with the L57 or 579 series.(firing pin assemblies) Thanks for all the fine pictures and the content. We await further surprises from Sako.-Misako
    Last edited by misako50; 16th May 2012 at 14:10.
    Cental USA

  6. #36
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    gunner620,
    Thanks for the info re the pin. By chance I have a L579 .243 sporter with the same pin on the side. So to recap - they were only made in 1974, is that correct?

    Any Aussies with Austalian information on these models?
    Thanks

    Moderators - Sorry if this is hijacking the original post, if so, please move this to the appropiate place.
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  7. #37
    Senior Member bloorooster's Avatar
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    Piper...No worries. Hijacking happens sometimes...I think the "Pin" hung around until '77-'78...phased out by the A Series~Bloo
    "Honesty may be the best policy, but it’s important to remember that apparently, by elimination, dishonesty is the second-best policy."
    .. George Carlin

    Almost Heaven...North America

  8. #38
    Senior Member gunner620's Avatar
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    piper,not sure when Sako totally got away from useing the pin and with Sako no part goes unused so ???? I have a 270 winchester L61R that I bought new in 1975 that had the pin
    it fell out at some point (don't know when) I am sure the rifle was used after the failure and continued to function.Once noticed it bothered me and I was able to find a shroud of the older type (with flats) and replaced it.That solved the problem and the rifle and me are both happy now.For information the shroud for the L579 and the L61R will interchange.The pin failure has happened but not a real commom thing so I wouldn't worry about it.I would keep an eye on it though because of the safety related issues.Sako advised that a decock could occur caused by misalignment of the cocking piece if the rifle was used without the pin. Jim
    Central Florida and Central Virginia, USA

  9. #39
    Senior Member deersako's Avatar
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    Just found this .222 rem mag for sale and thought Id post the pic. Short cocking piece and the "M" stamp.



    My own 5 digit L579 has the short cocking piece and the "M". Yes,"multigroove" barrel. The "M" stamp was discussed some time ago on the old site and we never really got to the bottom of it.
    Going by this thread and the previous one it appears that rifles imported to Australia and NZ during that era that had the multigroove barrels were stamped with an "M". Maybe these particular rifles all had the short cocking pieces also ?
    NSW Australia

  10. #40
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    Hi.... I live in Indonesia where I could not buy a new gun due to the restriction here.. ( sucks )
    previously I had sako rifle and I like it so much. Up until today I am still looking for second hand newer sako rifle.
    Recently, I bought 2 sako with the bolt look like the picture ( top gear's picture ) , which I do not really like it. That is come from 223 AI 823804 and 7 rem mag L61R 522369.
    Is there, anyway that I can change the shroud to a newer look or I am stuck with its model look.

    Please advice.

    Thanks

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