L61R Date?

Discussion in 'Sako Long/Magnum Actions' started by wombat, Mar 18, 2015.

  1. gunner620

    gunner620 Well-Known Member

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    That's a three lug bolt guide and two lug bolt. Also that guide doesn't have the pin through the bolt guide that I can see that is common to guide on a three lug , At least that's the way it looks to me. Jim

     

  2. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    I don't have my Classic anymore so I have nothing to compare it too. The bolt on mine was a two lug but I am thinking that the guide was a bit longer. I don't have pictures of it either.-Misako
     
  3. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    Here is a picture of one the L61R used to own-beautiful rifle.
     

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  4. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    I didn't think the "Classics" came until much later than 1972. Never stop discovering something new with Sakos I guess.
     
  5. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    I agree Paulson. I thought some years later. The stock does have a kind of finish on it that reminds me of the 72 I had. The later model Classics had low luster stocks, but the wood was still well figured like this one. Not out of the realm of possibility that it was restocked with a classic stock.-Misako
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015
  6. bloorooster

    bloorooster Sako-addicted

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    It is a great looking rifle...but it does have some odd things about it. The grip cap is one..I thought the Classic had a solid rosewood cap..the checkering pattern says model 72 as does the squared forearm shape, not to mention the rear sight. The straight combed stock design of the classic also came with the A series actions.
    I have seen a few with the cheek pieces and combs cut away...some were horrifying and some looked very nice. This one is one of the better looking...if it had a factory Pad on it , I could more so ponder the possibility that it came that way.....does the grip cap say Sako on it I wonder?.....my gut says it's a very tastefully done modification.
    But...my hat has many bites out of it...I've been wrong before~Bloorooster
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015
  7. 16b410

    16b410 Well-Known Member

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    I compared the stock to my Classic, and I'm pretty sure it isn't a Classic due to the pistol grip. The Classic has a very shallow wrist. Also the checkering panels are smaller in size with finer checkering. But there is a good chance that a previous owner modified the stock to reflect the Classic's appearance.
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The new photo makes it clear that the stock Monte Carlo has been removed and the stock refinished with a custom grip cap added. The factory Model 72 checkering was preserved. It is a very professional job which even preserves the "orange-ish" stain unique the the Model 72.

    It is true that the Sako Classic models (produced at a much later date than this rifle) had straight (non-Monte Carlo) stocks, but their shape and checkering pattern were much different from this stock and they were built with American walnut with an oil finish.
     
  9. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    The shape and checkering pattern are identical to the one that is shown in the picture I provided, It is also identical to the Classic that I owned and sold. The differences are the cap and pad. The finish went from a glossy in the older models to a satin lacquer in the newer models. There is not a possibility that that stock that is on the rifle was ever a monte carlo. -Misako
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    If you'll look closely at most Classics, their forearm checkering wrapped completely around the rounded forearm (however, on some late L691 Classics the checkering did not wrap completely around the forearm, but it still had the rounded shape.) The rifle in question appears to have only side panel checkering, not wrap-around checkering, and its forearm appears triangular.

    The photos don't provide sufficient perspective, but the stock of the Classic was very straight, making the comb the same height as most Monte Carlo stocks. I believe that the comb on the rifle in question is lower than a Classic.

    Also, the bolt handle sits at 90 degrees to the bolt body and is unswept -- a feature almost unique to the Model 72.

    Perhaps the owner could tell us if the tops of the receiver dovetails are smooth -- that would be one more piece of evidence that the rifle is a Model 72.
     
  11. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    I agree that some of the classic stocks did wrap but the later ones looked just like the pattern on the questionable rifle. I don't think for a second that that metal goes with that stock but I do know the stocks will interchange nicely. I think a modification to a classic on that stock is completely out of the realm of possible. You would need to start with an LOP of about 17 inches to get it to the point of not showing if it began as a Monte Carlo stock and then the compression lines of the original machining would show up on the change in contour of the cheekpiece. -Misako
     
  12. 16b410

    16b410 Well-Known Member

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    The only other way I know to get a final determination on the stock would be to check cast-off. The Classics had a great deal of it, whereas the stocks of the earlier rifles had little or none. A good friend of mine who is a southpaw is absolutely unable to fire my Classic from his left shoulder.
     
  13. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    True 16b410- I would also like to see the forend of the rifle and that may help some.-Misako
     
  14. wombat

    wombat Well-Known Member

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    Any other member had a Sako (early model) that has had some engraving from a previous owner? I have got onto a couple, one owned by a Govt. dept. for putting down stock on local roads from car collisions or "downed" animals at cattle saleyards, initials were on the floor plate and another under barrel just forward of the forend wood, bit like Firearms International - markings on Sako firearms in the US. If in an inconspicuous place do you think it detracts from the desirability of owning one in a standard and common calibre in a hunting rifle that will be used?? Any comments - or if any others have come across any with "owner markings".
    Jay
     
  15. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    In general, markings by a government agency don't detract from a firearm's value and can even add to it. Of course, most of those guns are military or police-type firearms, so it is very uncommon to see a Sako with governmental markings. Such markings certainly wouldn't damage it as a "working" rifle.
     
  16. topgear

    topgear Sako-addicted

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    I think that's the key bit to your question. If its a rifle that is going to be used then to me it makes no difference. But if your after something to put in your safe and never fire it then it probably does detract a lot.

    Its interesting however as I follow the L46's (non .222 cal.) a lot and have found some really high prices being paid lately for rifles many a few years back would consider only as hunting/using rifles and not pay a premium for. However, lately I've seen some pretty high prices paid for some pretty non original rifles so maybe the thinking is changing a bit on what is detracts on the appeal of these rifles nowdays.

    Bottom line is if you like it that's what really counts ;)

    Cheers John
     

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