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Renaissance Wax

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by icebear, Jul 31, 2022.

  1. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    There has been some discussion of waxing stocks and what to use. Renaissance Wax is highly regarded by many gun collectors, museum curators, etc. for its quality and shine. The arrival of a secondhand Ruger 10/22 stock gave me an opportunity to illustrate what a few coats of wax can do for a stock. The first photo shows the buttstock after five or six coats of RW; the second is the forend before applying any wax. The finish on the walnut stock is most likely a matte poly of some kind.

    I've also used plain Johnson's paste wax on stocks with good effect, and there are other excellent products.
    Wax 1.JPG Wax 2.JPG

     
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  2. atticus

    atticus Well-Known Member

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    It's great stuff, wood or metal
     
  3. atticus

    atticus Well-Known Member

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    It's great stuff, wood or metal
     
  4. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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  5. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I rub it out right away. RW dries almost instantly; there's no need to wait. It has a much lighter consistency than conventional paste waxes like Johnson's.
     
  6. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    That's interesting, icebear. I guess with the 5 or 6 applications, it builds up to a nice solid coat. With the English wax I referenced above, they recommend a 5-minute wait before polishing it off.
     
  7. atticus

    atticus Well-Known Member

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    I use it also. Great stuff. It is what I use on wood most of the time. I don't know if you got your from double gun journal, but I received notification, they are closing
     
  8. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Every product is different. Johnson's paste wax, which I used on guns before some other members of this forum put me on to Renaissance Wax, takes a good while to dry.

    And speaking of Johnson's Paste Wax, just plain wax can be used as a wood finish on hard woods. I once visited a workshop in Belize where woodcarvers made objects out of tropical hardwoods for the tourist trade. One carver was vigorously applying paste wax to a shark he had just finished sanding. This was the normal practice among Belizean woodcarvers. Here's a photo of a zericote wood shark I bought in Belize in 1979. The finish has never been touched, except for dusting.
    Shark 1.JPG
     
  9. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    No, I've got mine directly from England--William Evans (link above).
     
  10. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I just noticed on the label that Renaissance Wax is also made in England. With a royal warrant, even. "By Appointment to..." etc. Not sure if I'm impressed - on the one hand, royal purveyors do generally deal in quality goods. On the other hand, to be the equivalent of Lady Camilla's dressmaker... Maybe not so impressive. In any case, it's good stuff.
     
  11. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    I've found none better than,

    EEE WAX.jpg
     
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