The Sako 7x57 Mannlicher now on Gunbroker

Discussion in 'Sako Mannlichers and Carbines' started by stonecreek, Feb 25, 2019.

  1. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    This is causing me some serious soul-searching. Like many others, I want this gun. I can afford a fairly serious price for it. My pockets are not bottomless, but unless this thing goes into the stratosphere I can be a serious bidder. But, what is it really worth to me? What pleasure will it give me beyond my existing collection? How much to pay for pride of ownership? I'm still adding to the collection (bought a Golani last week), but as I age and my collection gets larger, I start to wonder if I really need or want another gun all that badly. On the one hand, it's a unique example because of the caliber. On the other hand, in appearance and performance it's all but indistinguishable from the AIII carbine in .30-06 I've had for 20 years. My wallet hand slows way down when the price of a gun goes beyond two grand or so. I've spent more, but I've spent a lot of time thinking before I did.


    I am a great fan of metric calibers. A friend of mine has, or used to have, a similar gun in 9.3x62, also a great rarity. I was an indirect beneficiary of his good fortune, as he decided he didn't need his AV sporter in the same caliber and sold it to me. I still have it; it's a fun shooter. And just the thing to keep the lions and bears from overrunning my back yard.

    I suspect this auction will go very high, and the winner will be a competitive collector with an unlimited budget who has to have it because it's the only one. I'm reminded of a story told to me by a friend who collects old toy trains. He once went to an auction where every desirable item went to the same bidder, a wealthy Texan who was a relatively new collector. Many items sold for well over any reasonable value; the guy simply had an unlimited budget and would buy anything he wanted no matter what it cost.

    I hope I'm wrong, and it goes for a price within reach. If so, I might just be posting a test firing result on this board. Or not. We'll see.
     
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  2. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    Good luck Icebear! The DFW area is expecting a late winter cold front with highs in the 30's Sunday, so I'm thinking some home made tamales and venison chili with grated cheese and chopped onions and a bucket full of Corona Extra served about an hour before the bidding finale, kinda like a tailgate party! I'll just watch the fun!
     
  3. GreyFox

    GreyFox Well-Known Member

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    Icebear,
    the 9.3X62 in AZ; Worst case scenario there's a catastrophic failure of the electronic locks at the zoo; there's lions and tigers and elephants on the loose!! You have the equipment, you are the HERO !!!

    It could happen...
     
  4. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    I'm betting that every one of you guys reading this thread also have that gun in your "watch" list. LOL
    And yes, I do too.....
     
  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Icebear: When it comes to what gun to buy and how much to pay for it, it boils down to what an item is worth to an individual. For you (and largely for me, too), you are somewhat more interested in a gun you can shoot than in one which stays wrapped in a preservation sack in the back of a safe. Others may buy guns that they intend never to shoot and would find it scandalous to fire an unfired gun (well, actually there's no such thing as an unfired gun, but that's for another discussion).

    Other factors play into buying decisions. I had a Marlin Model 57 "Levermatic" as my first .22 rifle. It was magical the way it never missed with the steady hands and sharp eyes of a kid in control. As a 13 year-old I won a turkey shoot with it. But in a few years, as the attention span of a youngster is short, I foolishly sold it and have pined for it ever since. So, a couple years ago I came across a pristine Model 57 and probably paid $100 over market for it simply because it was worth that to me. I'm sure others have had similar experiences.

    Whoever the "last man standing" in the auction for the 7x57 Mannlicher, it will be someone for whom the rifle is worth it to them.
    I can't say whether it will taper off in the two-thousands and go to a "shooter" or will soar into the five-thousands and go to a dedicated "collector". It all depends on who is paying attention and how they perceive it. Whatever the price, it will be "worth it" to the buyer.
     
  6. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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    So I have to add, that Sako, knowing this was a special order and a rarity, could have put on a decent bit of Timber. That is as plain Jane of a carbine stock as I've ever seen. Sour grapes? No, merely objective observation.
     
  7. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I noticed that too. It does seem odd that they would go to the trouble to build a gun chambered in an uncatalogued caliber and then give it such an ordinary stock. You'd think it would deserve something like the piece of walnut that's on my .222 carbine (which I have posted on the forum).

    That's one reason I hesitate to pay too much for the gun. At some point the price may get to where I could have one made, complete with exhibition grade wood. I have a couple of NIB L61R actions that aren't doing anything...

    Carbine 2.JPG
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2019
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  8. pow

    pow Well-Known Member

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    Well Well well “ One of a kind “ Now if anyone has preformed a search. You might just look for a member on this site named. “Gollum”

    And you will find some interesting informatiion on “one of a kind”
     
  9. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    POW: Why don't you just post a link to whatever thread you are finding of interest instead of swathing your comments in mystery?
     
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  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Sako seems never to have paid much attention to its stock wood, particularly in the earlier guns. Iceberg's beautiful Vixen, which is a standard grade, attests to this. Similarly, I've seen Deluxes on which the wood might as well have been Birch for all of the color and grain it lacked. With only a few exceptions, most of the SCA Finnwolf pairs I've seen have been pretty straight-grained oil finished stocks.

    Although the subject 7x57 Mannlicher is in pristine condition there is nothing special about its stock, its bluing, or its fit and finish -- only that it is a rare caliber for a Sako and perhaps totally unique for a Sako Mannlicher.
     
  11. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    +1
     
  12. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    the .222 is breath taking. . I did not seen any lions. but the new to me .270 ( loaded to approximate a 7x57) mannlicher worked on a coyote. . if I knew how to post pics. good luck on the 7mm. ron
     
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  13. pow

    pow Well-Known Member

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    Apparently Mr. Bell has found more information on the “ one of a kind”. He has posted an addition to his auction. And every bidder needs to take into consideration the new updated information.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
  14. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    I did see his clarification, I think he is trying to represent this gun in as factual light as possible. Trying to decipher why a person did or didn't do something that makes more sense, makes no sense. Maybe the guy lost a bet and had to buy a Sako and he didn't like sakos or 7X57's. Who knows, for that matter who cares. If someone wants a rare Sako configuration, I would suggest they bid on this gun, I did...
     
  15. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    Ok, here goes. This 7x57 auction frenzy has my pea brain thinking, what's going on? First of all we must have an understanding, because some of you may think the comments I am about to foolishly make are about you...….they are not about you. They are about me. Why do I have this urge to bid on this 7x57 rifle. I don't even like it. For example, yesterday I was surfing the internet and saw a very nice 55 year old German made Weatherby Varmintmaster in 22-250 with really great wood and bam! me, a guy that has never wanted to buy Weatherbys, wanted this damn Weatherby. I can't really figure out why. Back to the 7x57, I think I have the urge to bid on it so none of you buy it and shoot the barrel out....and there goes the one and only (we're not sure) 7x57 mannlicher. If I buy it, it'll not see the light of day until I'm gone. So I thought this through, and decided I'm still not going to bid. I think I made that decision because since its 1 of 1 no one will miss it if it gets used up and disappears, and therefore I shouldn't spend any money trying to save it for the future. Which isn't the case with our 7x33, Bees and Hornets and a few others.
     
  16. Hillcountry

    Hillcountry Well-Known Member

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    NICELY Stated Douglastwo!;)
     
  17. pow

    pow Well-Known Member

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    If the boys in Hamilton had made the same statement about selling a “one of a kind” Stonecreek would be more than silent about the “one of a kind” statement. And to accept as factual any statement by any auction house as truth proves the inconstancy of logic.
     
  18. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure what you just wrote. Your writing is like Haiku and I never was any good with poetry...
     
  19. deersako

    deersako Well-Known Member

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    At least you guys can have a crack at it.
    Even after repeated requests to Gunbroker, being in Australia, I can’t ‘watch’ or view bid history on it.
     
  20. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I respect your opinion - but I totally disagree. This gun was built to shoot, as are almost all firearms. The only exceptions are super-fancy exhibition guns with elaborate gold-filled engraving, carved stocks, etc. etc. Although it may be one of a kind, it's really just an everyday hunting rifle in an unusual caliber. Other than the caliber, it's indistinguishable from my .30-06 (or any other AIII/AV series carbine). We don't even know that it's unfired ex factory. If you or anyone buys it and wants to keep it as a wall hanger or safe queen, that's a personal decision, but I don't see that it rises to the level of saving a work of art for posterity. And as far as shooting out the barrel goes, I don't know how many thousand rounds of a medium pressure, medium velocity round like a 7x57 it would take to burn out a Sako barrel, but I'm not going to reach that threshold in my lifetime. And even a burned-out barrel can be relined to preserve the original markings. I've got a High Wall to prove it.

    I do not believe in the idea that a modern firearm is too rare or valuable to shoot. An antique, or a fragile item for which parts are nonexistent, that's another thing - but a modern hunting or military weapon that wasn't intended for a display case in the first place, no way. For example, there's a museum grade Mauser C96 Flatside Broomhandle with a matching stock in my safe, along with a couple hundred rounds of correct ammo. It probably hasn't been fired in 50 years. But the only reason I haven't fired it is that I haven't gotten around to taking it apart and cleaning and lubing it and maybe changing the springs. Maybe next week. But the thought that I wouldn't shoot it has never even occurred to me. Now, I have a couple of wallhangers that I wouldn't shoot because they aren't safe - but that's different. And if I had a Colt Lightning revolver I wouldn't shoot it because they are notoriously fragile - but then, I wouldn't want a Colt Lightning anyway, for precisely that reason.

    Everyone has their own philosophy of collecting - why, and to what end. Mine is to celebrate the excellence of firearms by keeping, preserving, and shooting them.
     
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